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Which State Drinks the Most Beer?

Which State Drinks the Most Beer?



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The National Institute put out their bi-annual report on beer consumption and other data in the U.S.

It’s no surprise that Americans love themselves a nice, cold beer. But, what states love the brews the most just may surprise you.

The Beer Institute put out its bi-annual list of the top beer-consuming states in the U.S. for 2012. North Dakota, New Hampshire, Montana, South Dakota, and Wisconsin made up the top five despite many being lightly populated states. North Dakota beer drinkers were putting them away with 45.8 gallons per capita consumption. This was more than twice the national average of 28.2 gallons per capita consumption.

Beer brewers also shipped 206,177,046 gallons total nationally in 2012, with California shipping the most beer at 22,317,858 gallons.

The report also put out other beer-related stats about 2012 in its report. The beer industry employed 1,077,020 people nationally and was responsible for $31,791,940,600 in wages for workers.

The report is important because it allows the institute to “proactively address industry issues, including supporting jobs in our communities, responsibly advertising and marketing beer, and paying more than our fair share in taxes,” according to a statement on the institute’s website.


Think You Know Which State Drinks the Most Beer?

Rumble — Americans love beer. From the hoppiest of the craft beer double IPAs right on down to the lightest of lagers, we love to crack open a cold one on any occasion. But which state has the most beer lovers? This map shows ranks states love beer the most.

The States That Drink the Most Beer, From Most to Least

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Which state drinks the most alcohol? Here's a ranking of all 50 (plus DC)

According to a study from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Americans drank 7.8 billion gallons of alcohol in 2018.

That breaks down to 6.3 billion gallons of beer, 900 million gallons of wine and 570 million gallons of hard liquor and spirits. Per capita, that breaks down to 2.35 gallons per person or about 501 drinks annually.

Some states and regions, however, drink more than others. Here’s a ranking of all 50 states plus Washington D.C. when it comes to drinking alcohol.

51. Utah

No big surprise here. The residents of Utah consume an average of just 1.35 gallons a year, more than three times less than the No. 1 spot on this list.

50. West Virginia

(AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

West Virginia will have to take solace in the fact that they’re still the nation’s top coal producer. The Mountaineer State consumes only 1.74 gallons of alcohol each year.

49. Arkansas

Arkansans drink 1.78 gallons of alcohol a year. Not sure if this pint that Bill Clinton tipped in Dublin when he was President of the United States would’ve counted toward that total.

48. Oklahoma

Oklahomas drink 1.85 gallons a year, often when they’re cheering on the Sooners, Cowboys or Thunder.

47. Georgia

(Photo by Davis Turner/Getty Images)

The eighth-most populous state in the country, Georgia consumes a total of 16.4 million gallons of alcohol each year, which puts them 11th in the nation.

Their average of 1.9 gallons, however, ranks much lower.

46. Kansas

Maybe the Sunflower State’s average of 1.92 gallons will go up now that grocery stores are no longer required to sell beer that only contains 3.2 percent alcohol.

45. Kentucky

All that great bourbon nearby and Kentuckians only average 1.95 gallons per year? (Would have figured they’d pass that just on Derby Day — or after the Wildcats or Cardinals get bounced from the tournament.)

44. Alabama

Bama comes in at 1.99 gallons, much of it consumed while watching the cars heat up at Talladega.

43. Ohio

Ohio residents drink 2.03 gallons per year, the lowest amount of any state in the upper Midwest.

42. Maryland

Maryland ranks 42nd with 2.08 gallons per year, even though the Orioles have given residents plenty of reason to drink way more.

41. Virginia

(AP Photo/Sally Carpenter Hale)

Virginia has a sneaky-good vineyard scene and its most famous resident, George Washington, loved to make his own beer at home. Today’s residents drink 2.13 gallons a year.

40. Tennessee

Tennessee drinks 2.14 gallons a year, much of it presumably in Jack Daniels.

39. Indiana

Hoosiers drink 2.15 gallons a year, though never before climbing behind the wheel of an Indy Car.

37. Nebraska

Omaha has an underrated night life and is a perfect spot for drinking an average of 2.16 gallons of alcohol per year.

37. South Carolina

Tied with Nebraska, the Palmetto State drinks 2.16 gallons per year.

35. MIssissippi

“The Grove” at the University of Mississippi pulls its fair share of weight before football games as the state averages 2.17 gallons per year.

35. North Carolina

AP Photo/Beth J. Harpaz, File)

Sierra Nevada has an outpost in Asheville and it produces beer that goes toward the state’s average of 2.17 gallons a year.

34. New York

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

This is somewhat of a shocker! New York’s average of 2.21 gallons ranks below 33 places that aren’t renowned for having a city that never sleeps.

33. Washington

(Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images)

How many beer funnels at a Seahawks game do you have to take to reach Washington’s average of 2.22 gallons?

32. Arizona

(Photo by Steve Dykes/Getty Images)

More than a few beers are consumed on hot golf courses, which helps Arizona to its average of 2.25 gallons per year.

30. Texas

(Photo by Donald Miralle/Getty Images for Rock n’ Roll)

The Lone Star state consumes an average of 2.26 gallons of alcohol a year.

30. New Mexico

(Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images for Lumix)

New Mexico has far fewer people than neighbor Texas but its per capita average of 2.26 gallons is right in line with their friends across the state border.

29. Pennsylvania

(Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

Pennsylvanians would presumably drink more than 2.34 gallons per year if they didn’t make buying alcohol such a convoluted process.

27. Michigan

(AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)

Michiganders drink an average of 2.36 gallons of alcohol per year.

27. New Jersey

Like Michigan, the state of New Jersey averages 2.26 gallons per years. That’s .05 more than New York.

26. South Dakota

South Dakota averages 2.37 gallons per year, which seems impressive for the fourth-smallest state … until you find out the three states that are smaller all drink more.

24. Illinois

(AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

A sunny day at Wrigley Field goes a long way toward Illinois’ average of 2.39 gallons per year.

24. Iowa

(Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

Iowa drinks just as much as its nextdoor neighbor, Illinois. Not surprising for Big Ten country.

23. Connecticut

(AP Photo/Steve Miller, File)

Connecticut residents drink an average of 2.4 gallons each year.

22. California

(AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

The most populous state ranks 22nd per capita with 2.49 gallons a year, but first overall in total volume with 81.2 million gallons.

21. Missouri

(AP Photo/Kyle Ericson, file)

The home of the Budweiser consumes an average of 2.51 gallons each year.

19. Louisiana

Louisiana residents weigh in with 2.55 gallons. You have to assume it’d be higher if they counted the tourists on Bourbon Street.

19. Massachusetts

(Photo by Aynsley Floyd/Invision for Gillette/AP Images)

Sam Adams would be proud of the 2.55 gallons that Massachusetts residents drink each year.

18. Florida

Nothing better than some sun, sand and the 2.61 gallons that Floridians drink to pass the time each year.

17. Rhode Island

Rhode Islanders drink an average of 2.63 gallons per year, which is ahead of a lot of the country, but still near the back of the pack when we’re talking about New England.

16. Hawaii

(Photo by Amy Sussman/Getty Images)

OK, who wants to drink one of these right now? (Hawaii consumes 2.66 gallons each year, by the way.)

15. Oregon

Some of the best craft beer in the nation comes out of Oregon so it’s easy to see why Oregonians drink 2.74 gallons each year.

14. Wyoming

(MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP via Getty Images)

Sparsely-populated Wyoming has the lowest total volume in the United States with just 1.3 millions gallons, but each resident pulls his or her share with 2.78 gallons per capita.

13. Minnesota

As we get into the heaviest-drinking states, you’ll notice that most of them share a common temperature in the winter (cold). Minnesota is definitely one of them and consumes 2.79 gallons a year.

11. Maine

Who’s hungry for some lobster? (Maine = 2.85 gallons a year)

11. Alaska

Alaska is on the exact opposite side of the United States from Maine, but consumes the exact same amount (2.85) as their northeastern friends.

10. Colorado

The host of the Great American Beer festival does its share of drinking the rest of the year with 2.88 gallons per capita.

9. Wisconsin

(AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

This is somewhat of a shocker! We went into this list thinking Wisconsin would be No. 1, but it’ll have to settle for top 10 with 2.93 gallons a year.

8. Idaho

Did you know you can make vodka from potatoes? Maybe that’s why Idaho ranks so high with 2.94 gallons per capita.

7. Vermont

The state that produces the most maple syrup ranks eighth in alcohol consumption with 3.06 gallons each year.

6. Montana

(AP Photo/Beth J. Harpaz, File)

We’d like to enjoy this view with a beer as well. Montana is sixth in the country with 3.1 gallons a year.

5. North Dakota

(AP Photo/Blake Nicholson, File)

Oh give me a home, where the buffalo roam and the deer and the antelope … drink 3.16 gallons per capita each year.

4. Nevada

(Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

The residents of Nevada work hard and they drink hard. To the tune of 3.42 gallons each year.

3. Delaware

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Dogfish Head has been doing craft beer for a long time and people nearby like to get after it, drinking 3.52 gallons each year. Not quite the First State in these rankings, but awfully close.

2. Washington D.C.

(SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)

Do we really have to tell you why D.C. ranks second on this list with 3.77 gallons each year?

1. New Hampshire

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Take a bow, New Hampshire residents. You rank first by a long mile with 4.67 gallons. Is there something you’d like to talk about?


States that drink the most beer

Here's a look at the states with the biggest beer drinkers.

Bertha Gutierrez serves up a drink as unlimited beer, wine, cordials and coffee are included in every meal. (Photo: STEVE MARCUS)

In recent years, Americans have increasingly moved away from beer consumption in favor of wines and spirits. U.S. beer consumption fell slightly from 28.3 gallons per drinking-aged adult in 2012 to 27.6 gallons last year.

Despite declining across the United States overall, beer consumption remains quite high in some states. According to a recent study from Beer Marketer's Insights, a brewing industry trade publisher, North Dakota residents consumed 43.3 gallons of beer per drinking-age adult in 2013, the most of any state. This was more than double the 19.6 gallons per legal age adult consumed in Utah, which drank the least beer. Based on figures from Beer Marketer's Insights, these are the states that drink the most beer.

Between 2002 and 2012, the share of Americans' total alcohol intake coming from beer has declined. The average drinking age adult drank the equivalent of 1.39 gallons of pure ethanol alcohol from beer in 2002, with a total intake of 2.39 gallons from all drinks consumed. In 2012, Americans pure alcohol intake was 2.46 gallons per person. Americans' alcohol intake from wine and spirits rose by 15.2% and 20.9%, respectively, between 2002 and 2012. Meanwhile, intake from beer dropped by 8.6%.

While some of the states that drink the most beer generally followed this national trend, other states did not. Between 2002 and 2012, alcohol intake from beer consumption declined by 17.4% in Nevada, one of the top beer drinking states. In that time, alcohol intake from wine rose by more than 30%. On the other hand, alcohol intake from beer rose by more than 10% in both Vermont and Maine, also among the top beer drinking states.

Consuming excessive amounts of alcohol is associated with a range of health problems. One in 10 deaths among working age adults in the United States is due to excessive drinking, according to figures recently released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

According to the study, "Excessive alcohol use is responsible for 2.5 million years of potential life lost annually, or an average of about 30 years of potential life lost for each death." Leading the nation in beer consumption, however, did not necessarily increase years lost per legal-age adult. Only three of the top beer drinking states exceeded the national average for years of potential life lost per 100,000 residents between 2006 and 2010.

According to Mandy Stahre, a co-author on the CDC's study and an epidemiologist with the Washington State Department of Health, health outcomes such as alcohol attributable death rates are influenced by a number of factors, not only drinking patterns. "The number and the enforcement of alcohol control policies … sociodemographics, religious affiliation, race and ethnicity" all can play a role in determining the health consequences of drinking.

In an email to 24/7 Wall St., Eric Shepard, vice president and executive editor at Beer Marketer's Insights, highlighted a study from the U.K.-based Institute of Economic Affairs, a free market think tank. The study explores the relationship between problematic drinking and consumption levels.

Policy makers often believe that high per capita consumption leads to excessive drinking, which includes heavy and binge drinking. However, the study's authors contend that "per capita alcohol consumption largely depends on the amount of heavy drinking in the population, not vice versa." Stahre added the she, too, was aware of studies that showed "a good proportion of the alcohol that was consumed was being consumed in a manner [associated with] binge drinking."

The states with the highest beer consumption rates also had high rates of heavy drinking — defined as more than two drinks per day for men and more than one drink per day for women. In Montana and Wisconsin, 8.5% of adults were heavy drinkers as of 2012, tied for the most in the United States and well above the national rate of 6.1%. Additionally, seven of the states that drink the most beer had among the 10 highest rates of binge drinking — defined by the CDC for women as consuming four or more drinks, and five or more drinks in the case of men, during a single sitting.

Interestingly, while excessive alcohol use is hardly a healthy behavior, many of the states with the highest beer consumption rates were also likely to practice a range of healthy behaviors such as exercising regularly and eating well. People in Maine, New Hampshire, South Dakota and Vermont, for example, were all among the most likely Americans to eat healthy all day last year. Residents of Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota and Vermont were among the most likely to exercise regularly.

Stahre noted, however, that people are often better at keeping track of other behaviors than they are about drinking. "Because if you aren't paying the bill or not paying attention to the number of drinks you have, you could really be underestimating what your consumption is."

To identify the states with the highest beer consumption rates, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed Beer Marketer's Insights' recent report on alcohol consumption. Drinking habits were measured in gallons shipped to distributors annually per 100,000 drinking-age adults. Adult heavy and binge drinking statistics are from the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and are for 2012. We also utilized figures from a recent CDC study, titled "Contribution of Excessive Alcohol Consumption to Deaths and Years of Potential Life Lost in the United States." This study examined data from 2006 through 2010 for Americans of all ages. We also reviewed healthy behaviors and health outcomes from Gallup's 2013 HealthWays Well-Being Index. Economic data came from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2012 American Community Survey. Brewery totals are from the Beer Institute's 2013 Brewer's Almanac and are for 2012. Tax data are from the Federation of Tax Administrators and are current as of January 2014.

These are the states that drink the most beer.

> Per capita consumption: 43.3 gallons
> Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 3.69 gallons (2nd highest)
> Pct. binge drinkers: 24.1% (2nd highest)
> Total brewers (2012): 4

North Dakota residents are the nation's largest beer drinkers, consuming an average of 43.3 gallons per drinking age adult in 2013. One reason for this may be binge drinking. In 2012, more than 24% of the adult population reported binge drinking, more than in any state except for Wisconsin. Between 2002 and 2012, North Dakota led the nation with a 24% increase in pure alcohol consumption per capita. By comparison, consumption nationwide rose by slightly less than 3% in that time. Most of the increase in alcohol intake between 2002 and 2012 came from higher spirits consumption. High levels of beer consumption, binge drinking and alcohol intake may be related to the state's attractiveness to younger Americans looking for work. North Dakota had the nation's lowest unemployment rate in 2013 and has had the nation's fastest growing state economy in each of the past four years.

> Per capita consumption: 42.2 gallons
> Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 4.74 gallons (the highest)
> Pct. binge drinkers: 17.0% (22nd highest)
> Total brewers (2012): 21

New Hampshire trailed only one other state in total per capita beer consumption in 2013, and it was the nation's leading state for beer drinking as recently as 2011. Additionally, New Hampshire led the nation in per capita intake of alcohol in 2012, with residents drinking the equivalent of 4.7 gallons of pure alcohol that year on average, versus 2.5 gallons per legal adult nationwide. However, these figures may be somewhat distorted by sales to non-residents by liquor stores located near state borders. Visitors often buy liquor and wine in the state because of the lack of tax at state-run liquor stores.

> Per capita consumption: 40.5 gallons
> Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 3.13 gallons (6th highest)
> Pct. binge drinkers: 21.8% (5th highest)
> Total brewers (2012): 31

A legal age Montana resident consumed an average of 40.5 gallons of beer in 2013, down from more than 43 gallons in 2009. Montana residents were largely beer drinkers, even though the state ranked 12th in total alcohol intake from spirits in 2012, per capita intake from wine was roughly in line with the nation as a whole. Dangerous drinking was also quite common in the state, where 8.5% of adults were heavy drinkers in 2012, tied with Wisconsin for highest rate in the nation. Additionally, almost 22% of the adult population engaged in binge drinking, more than in all but a few states. High levels of drinking had notable health implications for residents as well. There were 37.7 alcohol-attributable deaths per 100,000 residents in Montana between 2006 and 2010, more than in all but two other states.

> Per capita consumption: 38.1 gallons
> Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 2.94 gallons (8th highest)
> Pct. binge drinkers: 20.6% (8th highest)
> Total brewers (2012): 10

South Dakota adults consumed 11.4% more pure alcohol in 2012 than they did in 2002, a larger increase than in all but a handful of states. Most of this increase came from spikes in wine and spirits consumption. While alcohol intake from beer grew by less than 1% — still one of the larger increases nationwide — legal-age adults in South Dakota increased both their wine and spirits intake by more than 30% over that time. Binge drinking may have contributed substantially to the state's consumption totals. More than 20% of legal-age adults in South Dakota reported consuming at least four drinks in a sitting in 2012, among the highest binge drinking rates nationwide.

> Per capita consumption: 35.9 gallons
> Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 3.02 gallons (7th highest)
> Pct. binge drinkers: 19.3% (10th highest)
> Total brewers (2012): 25

While Americans nationwide drank less beer in 2012 than they did in 2002, Vermonters consumed 11.2% more alcohol from beer. This was the largest increase in the country. The dramatic spike may be due in part to growing enthusiasm for craft beers, for which Vermont has become famous. Several local Vermont beers have been rated among the world's best, and in some cases black markets have emerged in the wake of excess demand. Like several other states with the highest beer consumption rates, wine has also become considerably more popular in recent years. Drinking-age Vermonters consumed nearly one-fifth of a gallon more alcohol from wine in 2012 than they did in 2002, the largest increase in gallons nationwide, and roughly four times the increase across the country.

24/7 Wall St. is a USA TODAY content partner offering financial news and commentary. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.


An Unofficial List of Every State’s Signature Cocktail

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I’m unsure if there is anyone out there who doesn’t love alcohol, even if it’s the occasional beer or nightly glass of wine. So, in celebration of this country’s patriotism (toward alcohol), we have rounded up the signature cocktails for every state… including Washington DC.

We based this list on popularity, relevance and origin of each cocktail. Grab a drink – preferably one with high alcohol content – and see which cocktail best represents your home state. And once you try every cocktail, be sure to visit the most unique bars in every major city. Cheers!

Alabama: Yellowhammer

Roll Tide!

A photo posted by josiemoser (@josiemoser) on Sep 20, 2014 at 12:27pm PDT

The Tuscaloosa bar, Gallette’s, ​sells 4,000-5,000 Yellowhammers at every University of Alabama home game… That’s when you know it’s good. The Yellowhammer is Gallette’s trademark beverage. Essentially, if you live in Alabama, you’ve been to a University of Alabama game and have indulged in the beloved (and strong) Yellowhammer.

Alaska: Duck Fart

Photo courtesy of wikipedia.com

Serious question: Does this shot taste better than it sounds? I sure as hell hope so, ’cause Alaskans go crazy for this layered shot of Kahlua, Bailey’s Irish Cream and Crown Royal whiskey. They claim that the “flavors mesh so well together.” I’ll just take their word for it.

Arizona: Tequila Sunrise

Photo courtesy of callmefudge.com

The OG tequila sunrise originated in Arizona in the 1930’s as a mix of tequila, crème de cassis, lime juice and soda water. The modern (and more deadly) version of tequila, orange juice and grenadine came later from young bartenders in California. So, like, that’s irrelevant and Arizona drinks more tequila sunrises anyways.

For all those kids out there that go to NAU, I’m jealous of Tequila Sunrise. If you don’t know, downtown Flagstaff’s bars kick off the university’s homecoming festivities with a (read: many) glasses of this classic Arizona drink. Now ya know.

Arkansas: Arkansas Razorback

Photo courtesy of cocktailcoop.com

Woo Pig Sooie! This cocktail consists of fresh raspberries, fruit punch and turbinado sugar, and is the perfect way to celebrate the Razorbacks. If you drink enough of them, they will keep you warm during those chilly winter tailgates.

California: Napa Valley Wine

Saturday vibes at @signorelloestate! #VisitNapaValley

A photo posted by Napa Valley (@visitnapavalley) on Jul 25, 2015 at 12:54pm PDT

All trendy drinks aside, it can’t be denied that California will forever be known for their wineries up north. These grapes create some of the best wine in the world, and you are insane if you are from California and have never been to Napa.

Californian’s do what they can for a bottle of wine from Napa, even if it’s 15 dollars and sold at Costco. End of story.

Colorado: Colorado Bulldog

A #coloradobulldog to honor our last day in #denver #girlsvacay

A photo posted by Jenny Canzoneri (@jennsmooter) on Aug 6, 2015 at 1:57pm PDT

The difference between a Colorado Bulldog and a White Russian, you ask? The Bulldog is bubbly… Just like the peeps from Colorado.

It is claimed that the name of this beloved drink was derived from Peanuts, an English bulldog and the original Colorado State University mascot. This was before they became the Aggie Rams. We owe you one, CSU.

Connecticut: Dark ’N Stormy

Photo courtesy of movitabeaucoup.com

You know people are serious about a drink when they claim that “a Dark ‘n Stormy is only a Dark ‘n Stormy when served with Gosling’s 80 proof black seal Bermuda rum.”

Every bartender in the Connecticut area has perfected a Dark ‘n Stormy recipe because someone is bound to order one. Whether it’s to take a cool break from the hot summer weather or to prepare for the impending rain and snow storms.

Delaware: Dogfish Head Ale

Since opening in 1995 in Milton, Delaware, Dogfish Head Alehouse essentially began the craft beer craze that’s goin’ on today. The people of Delaware even changed their laws to open the brewery because they love these “off-centered ales for off-centered people” so much.

Florida: Rum Runner

Rumor has it, the Rum Runner cocktail was invented at the Holiday Isle Tiki Bar in Islamorada, Florida. When the head bartender was forced to get rid of old alcohol, he came up with the Rum Runner – a mix of pineapple juice, orange juice, blackberry liqueur, banana liqueur, light rum, dark rum and grenadine. Oh, don’t forget the shot of Bacardi 151 that sits on top.

Since then, Floridians have made it their mission to perfect the rum runner recipe. No doubt that it’s a perfect cocktail to sip while getting your tan on.

Georgia: Scarlet O’Hara

Photo courtesy of emmamartiny.dk

In celebration of the southern belle in Gone With The Wind and the gem of the south that is Southern Comfort, the Scarlet O’Hara has been given the title of Georgia’s signature cocktail.

It may not be the most ordered or most popular cocktail in the state, and frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn. However, it definitely represents its southern roots.

Hawaii: Mai Tai

Photo courtesy of hawaii-aloha.com

Yeah, yeah, I know. The Mai Tai was created in California, but the Mai Tai is way more popular in Hawaii. There isn’t a bar in the state that doesn’t claim that the Mai Tai is their most ordered cocktail.

Mai Tai + Hawaiian beaches = heaven. Obvi.

Idaho: Evan Williams Bourbon

Photo courtesy of dailyfinance.com

It’s no doubt that America loves whiskey more than any other alcohol, but when Idahoans head to the liquor store, they know the right brand to buy. Thank you, Kentucky, for creating Evan Williams. It is such a beautiful masterpiece. Idaho appreciates it.

Illinois: JG&L

Photo courtesy of thewanderlush.com

Between the Illinois Irish, the Notre Dame Irish and turning the Chicago River green on St. Patty’s Day, it’s no surprise that Illinois is in love with all things Irish. Why should their signature cocktail be any different? Jameson Irish Whiskey couldn’t represent this state better.

The Jameson Ginger and Lime is the most refreshing mix of a trendy cool beer (cause we all know that Chi Town is the trendiest) and the state’s most consumed alcohol.

Indiana: Jägerbomb

Photo courtesy of mankind.co.uk

Jägermeister is one of the most purchased alcohols in Indiana, so you can’t go wrong with a Jägerbomb. These shots are fun to take, but don’t drink too many of them. Take it from the Hoosiers (and not just IU students) who have mastered the art of jägerbombs.

Iowa: Templeton Rye

Templeton Rye, better known as “The Good Stuff,” is one of Iowa’s finest productions. Based on a prohibition era recipe, every bottle of Templeton Rye is smooth as smooth can be. It’s so good that it’s typically consumed on the rocks. If that doesn’t tickle your fancy, use it to create the smoothest old fashioned or manhattan that you’ve ever tried.

Kansas: Horsefeather

The Horsefeather first appeared in Lawrence, Kansas in the 1990’s and has since flourished throughout the state. If you’ve never been to Kansas before, you’ve probably have never heard of this spicy cocktail. Think Moscow Mule, but whiskey instead of vodka. Oh, hell ya. This is something you should be proud of, KS.

Kentucky: Mint Julep

Photo courtesy of kentuckyderby.com

Okay, this one is a no brainer. Who doesn’t know that the Mint Julep is THE drink in Kentucky. Just to prove it to you, each year almost 120,000 Mint Juleps are served over the two-day period of Kentucky Derby weekend at Churchill Downs Racetrack.

Louisiana: Sazerac

The sazerac came about in a New Orleans apothecary way way back in 1838 as the world’s first cocktail ever. So, clearly it deserves its place as Louisiana’s signature cocktail.

Maine: Allen’s Coffee Brandy and Milk

Photo courtesy of punchdrink.com

This drink, also known as the sombrero, is a crucial staple in the diet of anyone who lives in Maine. You can’t find a bartender who DOESN’T know what an Allen’s and Milk is.

Maryland: Black Eyed Susan

Photo courtesy of baltimoresun.com

The Black Eyed Susan is the official drink of the Preakness, an American horse race held each year in Baltimore, Maryland. This beautiful mix of vodka, St. Germain, pineapple juice, lime juice and orange juice is the perfect representation of this small state, as well as the most refreshing way to celebrate the winning horse.

Massachusetts: Cape Codder

Photo courtesy of uk.thebar.com

With Ocean Spray cranberry juice headquartered in Massachusetts, their signature cocktail MUST feature this yummy drink. What’s better than a basic as f*ck vodka cranberry? Add a lime and call it a Cape Codder.

Michigan: The Hummer

Photo courtesy of theviewfromgreatisland.com

Born in Detroit at the Bayview Yacht Club, The Hummer cocktail became nationally famous thanks to Jerome Adams. Bars throughout the state (and even from other states) began begging for the recipe because club members would enter other bars asking for a Hummer.

Though every bar has their own modifications on the recipe now, they are all delicious and representative of Michigan’s love for alcohol.

Minnesota: The Bootleg

Photo courtesy of mygourmetconnection.com

The Bootleg is the official drink of Minnesota and the happiest medium of a gin and tonic and a mojito. The only thing is, you’ve gotta be bougie and have access to a country club in Minnesota to actually purchase the mix. OR you could just be janky and make them at home.

Mississippi: Mississippi Punch

Photo courtesy of mincocktail.blogspot.com

You would think that this mix of three alcohols would have originated on Ole Miss’ frat row in attempts to get college kids druuuunk. However, it has actually been around since the 1860’s and it surprisingly doesn’t taste like gasoline.

Between the French cognac, American bourbon and Jamaican rum, this cocktail is essentially Mississippi history in a glass that WILL get you drunk.

Missouri: Caribou Lou

#cariboulou #151 #cocktails #malibu Yummy cocktails with my hubby @tony_zombos

A photo posted by Vanessa Sheargold (@vanessasavi81) on Sep 30, 2015 at 1:22am PDT

“We mixed it up and then I say we treat Caribizzle like our lady. Originated in Kansas City, Missouri since 1995 baby.” Thanks, Tech N9ne for teaching Missouri the classic 151 rum, pineapple juice and Malibu mix. It’s a real hit.

Montana: Whiskey Ditch

Photo courtesy of boisdale.co.uk

Quick english lesson: Ordering a drink followed by “ditch” means “with water.” Montanans don’t f*ck around when it comes to alcohol, so they obviously only use water as a mixer.

The next time you’re in Montana, order a whiskey ditch to fit in, but make sure that you know what you are getting yourself into.

Nebraska: Founders Brewing Curmudgeon Old Ale

#brewedfor classic seafaring ports, local pubs and weathered old fisherman…

A photo posted by Founders Brewing Co. (@foundersbrewing) on May 8, 2015 at 12:46pm PDT

Specific, I know, but Nebraska loves their beer and they want to find the best craft beer, even if it means that it comes from Michigan. This microbrew was the most purchased beer in Nebraska for the past few years, so it must be good.

Nevada: The Nevada Cocktail

Photo courtesy of cocktailia.com

Given that weekends in Vegas are both sweet and sour, this cocktail reflects those feelings exactly. In thanks to the state that brought us endless fun, drinks and gambling, it deserves nothing more than a cocktail named after it.

New Hampshire: Fireball

It is literally proven that New Hampshire is America’s booziest state. With that being said, they deserve a cheap alcohol that you can never get tired of. Fireball is exactly that. Everyone drinks so much more of it than they think… Then it’s game over.

New Jersey: Jack Rose

Photo courtesy of temperedspirits.com

New Jersey bartender, Frank J. May, created the Jack Rose in the early 20th century. The people that live in the dirty Jerz are proud of their apples, so this cocktail incorporates applejack, grenadine and lemon juice.

New Mexico: Chimayo Cocktail

Photo courtesy of mixmentor.net

A tequila and apple cider based drink, the chimayo cocktail was created at a restaurant ten miles outside of Santa Fe. This cocktail even features apples that are grown in the Chimayó valley.

New York: Long Island Iced Tea

Photo courtesy of wikipedia.com

Manhattan.. Def LIT. Even though New York is one of the states that apparantly drinks the least, when they do, this heavy duty cocktail is just what every New Yorker needs. There also isn’t a better cocktail to represent this state.

North Carolina: The Cherry Bounce

Photo courtesy of thebigdrinksf.blogspot.com

Originating at Isaac Hunter’s Tavern, a bar ten miles outside of Raleigh, the cherry bounce is considered the official cocktail of the state’s capital city. But this cocktail isn’t just found in Raleigh. The entire state loves this mix of cherries, sugar and hard alcohol (the choice is yours).

North Dakota: Fargo Brewing Company Iron Horse Pale Ale

Woah, North Dakota is one of the six states in the country that consumes over 40 gallons of beer per person over 21 per year. So, like, they’re hopivores, right? Since they love beer so much, Fargo Brewing Company spent five years growing into the most popular craft brewery in North Dakota.

Ohio: Buckeye Martini

Photo courtesy of garnishblog.com

Named after the beloved Ohio State University mascot, Brutus Buckeye, this cocktail is simple and to the point. A mix of gin, dry vermouth and black olives is the perfect tribute to this effortless state.

Oklahoma: Bloody Mary

Photo courtesy of foodandtravelfun.com

The variety of Bloody Marys that have made their way to Oklahoma is SO many. Mainly because Oklahomans can’t stay away from brunch. You can even order the Tiger’s Blood, the Bloody Mary to end all Bloody Marys, at S&B Burger in Oklahoma City.

Oregon: Sloe Gin Fizz

Photo courtesy of chowhound.net

“Well Portland, Oregon and sloe gin fizz, If that ain’t love then tell me what is.” Thanks, Loretta Lynn. You essentially dubbed the sloe gin fizz as the drink of Oregon.

Pennsylvania: Yuengling

Thumbs up to ending the week right. #TGIF #yuengling #lagerlove #beerhere

A photo posted by D.G. Yuengling & Son, Inc. (@yuenglingbeer) on Sep 25, 2015 at 3:40pm PDT

D. G. Yuengling & Sons, based in Pottsville, Pennsylvania is the oldest operating brewing company in the United States. This german beer is not only America’s #1 favorite brew, it is one hundred percent Pennsylvania’s pride and joy. Don’t be caught with a Bud Heavy in your hand… Just don’t.

Rhode Island: Rhode Island Red

Photo courtesy of liquor.com

One tequila, two tequila, three tequila, FLOOR! This is one big drink for one little state. When Rhode Islanders do it, they do it big with a killer mix of tequila, Chambord, lemon juice, orange bitters and ginger beer. It just sums up the state so well.

South Carolina: Firefly Sweet Tea

Who thinks of the south and doesn’t think of sweet tea. On Wadmalaw Island in South Carolina, Firefly Spirits produced the world’s first Sweet Tea Vodka. Seriously genius. This spirit is a taste of southern hospitality at its finest.

South Dakota: Bud Light

I feel like every South Dakotan’s idea of a night out is grabbing a 12-pack of beer from the store and splitting it between the boys. Bud Light is no craft beer, but it’s cheap AF, and that’s all that matters, right? SD, I think you’re doin’ it right.

Tennessee: Moonshine

Photo courtesy of olesmoky.com

Back in the day, moonshine was an illegal, untaxed liquor that was created by the light of the moon (or so they claim). When the state’s laws changed to allow the distillation of spirits, Ole Smoky changed the game and now it’s the love of every Tennesseean’s life.

Texas: Frozen Margarita

Photo courtesy of bestmargaritamachines.com

In Dallas in 1971, Mariano Martinez made margs in a soft serve ice cream machine and called it “The World’s First Frozen Margarita Machine.” Over time, the frozen margarita has undoubtedly become the most popular cocktail in the entire state of Texas.

Utah: Polygamy Nitro Porter

Photo courtesy of graphis.com

Utah has the strangest liquor laws and the lowest alcohol consumption in the country. However, Wasatch Brewery was the first brewery in Utah and rules the charts for the most popular beer in Utah, especially with the Polygamy Nitro Porter. Utahns apparently really dig dark beers. You do you, Utah.

Vermont: Old Vermont

Photo courtesy of foodnetwork.com

Spotlighting the maple syrup that Vermont prides itself on, the Old Vermont is a delicious mix of gin, orange juice, bitters and maple syrup. It might not be frequently ordered at a bar, but it does the state justice.

Virginia: Any Glass from Virginia Wine Country

Beautiful view… My blue heaven! @katiebreuning come home. ??

A photo posted by Colleen Breuning (@colleenbreuning) on Oct 22, 2015 at 1:28pm PDT

Wine, Virginia style, is what’s up. A bottle of wine from Virginia wine country is better than most across the country. If you really want to get authentic, head to one of the 250 wineries in the area and treat yourself to a kayak wine tasting adventure.

Washington: Washington Apple

Photo courtesy of thepikeplacekitchen.com

Most likely inspired by President Washington and his apple tree, the Washington Apple is a tart tribute to this state. Washingtonians even go so far as to support their northern friends in Canada as the Washington Apple always features Crown Royal whiskey.

West Virginia: Copperhead

Photo courtesy of thedrinkkings.com

Much more appealing than the venomous copperhead snake that slithers around West Virginia is the copperhead cocktail. Enjoy one of these babies after indulging in a day of outdoor recreational activities that West Virginia is so well known for.

Wisconsin: Brandy Old Fashioned

Photo courtesy of radiomilwaukee.org

Wisconsinites don’t f*ck around with their Old Fashioned’s. Most versions of this cocktail are made with whiskey, but if you’re in Wisconsin, the cocktail is made with a heavy pour of brandy.

Wyoming: Franzia Chillable Red

For the least populated state in the country, it’s kind of shocking that people love boxed wine. For a number of years in a row, Franzia Chillable Red was the top-selling wine in Wyoming. #slapthebag


10 states where people drink the most beer

In recent years, Americans have increasingly moved away from beer consumption in favor of wines and spirits. U.S. beer consumption fell slightly from 28.3 gallons per drinking-aged adult in 2012 to 27.6 gallons last year.

Despite declining across the U.S. overall, beer consumption remains quite high in some states. According to a recent study from Beer Marketer’s Insights, a brewing industry trade publisher, the highest consuming state averaged 43.3 gallons of beer per drinking-age adult in 2013. This was more than double the 19.6 gallons per legal age adult consumed in Utah, which drank the least beer.

From 24/7 Wall St., based on figures from Beer Marketer’s Insights, these are the 10 states that drink the most beer:

10. Iowa

Per capita consumption: 33.2 gallons

Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 2.55 gallons (23rd highest)

Percent binge drinkers: 21.7% (6th highest)

Like most of the country, Iowa residents have been drinking less beer than they did in 2009, when they consumed slightly more than 36 gallons of beer per drinking-age adult. By 2013, consumption had declined to just over 33 gallons. Iowans, though, still drink more than most Americans. While beer consumption had declined, consumption of other forms of alcohol had increased. Iowa adults drank 59.6% — nearly a third of a gallon — more spirits in 2012 than they did 10 years before, a greater increase than in all but a few other states. Overall, alcohol intake in Iowa rose by 13.3%, among the highest increases in the nation. The state’s relatively high binge drinking rate may be behind the increased alcohol consumption. More than one in five legal-age Iowa residents reported binge drinking in 2012, among the highest rates nationwide.

9. Nebraska

Per capita consumption: 34.2 gallons

Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 2.69 gallons (16th highest)

Percent binge drinkers: 22.1% (3rd highest)

Like most of the nation, beer consumption in Nebraska has fallen in recent years. Consumption of other forms of alcohol has been on the rise. Drinking-age Nebraskans’ intake of hard alcohol rose by 39% in 2012, compared with 2002, among the largest such increases nationwide. This amounted to an additional one-fourth of a gallon of pure alcohol for each drinking-age adult. State residents were also among the most likely to binge drink, as 22.1% of adults reported consuming four or more drinks in one occasion in 2012, which was more than in all but two other states. The CDC has associated binge drinking with a variety of health problems. Nebraska residents, however, are among the nation’s healthiest, according to a recent Gallup poll.

8. Maine

Per capita consumption: 34.8 gallons

Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 2.86 gallons (10th highest)

Percent binge drinkers: 17.7% (17th highest)

Beer is exceptionally popular in Maine despite the .35 per gallon excise tax in the state, among the higher alcohol tax rates in the country. While alcohol intake from beer consumption fell 8.6% between 2002 and 2012 across the nation, Maine’s intake from beer increased 11% during that time, nearly the largest increase nationwide. Last year, beer consumption amounted to nearly 35 gallons per drinking-age adult in Maine. One explanation for Maine’s high beer consumption could be its low population density, which is often linked to higher substance abuse rates. Maine residents were also more likely than Americans overall to binge drink on a regular basis.

7. Nevada

Per capita consumption: 34.9 gallons

Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 3.48 gallons (4th highest)

Percent binge drinkers: 15.1% (13th lowest)

Nevada has among the nation’s highest beer consumption rates. Still, it was one of the few states where total alcohol intake actually decreased between 2002 and 2012. Nevada residents drank more than 8% less alcohol in 2012 than they did in 2002. Over that time, alcohol intake from beer alone fell by more than 17%, also nearly the largest decrease nationwide. Nevada is the only state on this list where residents were less likely than the nation as a whole to binge drink, with just 15% of adults consuming four or more drinks in one sitting in 2012. In Nevada’s case, declines in alcohol consumption may be due to economic conditions and declines in tourism. Nevada has struggled with high unemployment in recent years. Not only are residents strapped for cash, but also the state has raised alcohol taxes in recent years in search of more reliable revenue sources. At left, people play beer pong in Las Vegas.

6. Wisconsin

Per capita consumption: 35.8 gallons

Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 3.20 gallons (5th highest)

Percent binge drinkers: 25.2% (the highest)

More than one-quarter of Wisconsin adults reported binge drinking in 2012, the most nationwide. That year, 8.5% also reported heavy drinking — defined as consuming large numbers of drinks weekly — which was tied with Montana for the most nationwide. State residents have favored wine in recent years. While alcohol intake from beer actually fell by 8% between 2002 and 2012, per capita wine intake increased by 31% over that time, a larger increase than in all but a handful of states. Low taxes may have something to do with beer’s popularity in the state. Wisconsin’s excise tax for a gallon of beer is just six cents, versus a 20-cent nationwide median excise tax and less than all but just two other states.

5. Vermont

Per capita consumption: 35.9 gallons

Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 3.02 gallons (7th highest)

Percent binge drinkers: 19.3% (10th highest)

While Americans nationwide drank less beer in 2012 than they did in 2002, Vermonters consumed 11.2% more alcohol from beer. This was the largest increase in the country. The dramatic spike may be due in part to growing enthusiasm for craft beers, for which Vermont has become famous. Several local Vermont beers have been rated among the world’s best, and in some cases black markets have emerged in the wake of excess demand. Like several other states with the highest beer consumption rates, wine has also become considerably more popular in recent years. Drinking-age Vermonters consumed nearly one-fifth of a gallon more alcohol from wine in 2012 than they did in 2002, the largest increase in gallons nationwide, and roughly four times the increase across the country.

4. South Dakota

Per capita consumption: 38.1 gallons

Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 2.94 gallons (8th highest)

Percent binge drinkers: 20.6% (8th highest)

South Dakota adults consumed 11.4% more pure alcohol in 2012 than they did in 2002, a larger increase than in all but a handful of states. Most of this increase came from spikes in wine and spirits consumption. While alcohol intake from beer grew by less than 1% — still one of the larger increases nationwide — legal-age adults in South Dakota increased both their wine and spirits intake by more than 30% over that time. Binge drinking may have contributed substantially to the state’s consumption totals. More than 20% of legal-age adults in South Dakota reported consuming at least four drinks in a sitting in 2012, among the highest binge drinking rates nationwide.

3. Montana

Per capita consumption: 40.5 gallons

Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 3.13 gallons (6th highest)

Percent binge drinkers: 21.8% (5th highest)

A legal age Montana resident consumed an average of 40.5 gallons of beer in 2013, down from more than 43 gallons in 2009. Montana residents were largely beer drinkers, even though the state ranked 12th in total alcohol intake from spirits in 2012, per capita intake from wine was roughly in line with the nation as a whole. Dangerous drinking was also quite common in the state, where 8.5% of adults were heavy drinkers in 2012, tied with Wisconsin for highest rate in the nation. Additionally, almost 22% of the adult population engaged in binge drinking, more than in all but a few states. High levels of drinking had notable health implications for residents as well. There were 37.7 alcohol-attributable deaths per 100,000 residents in Montana between 2006 and 2010, more than in all but two other states. At left, a large crowd attends the Black Star Beer Barter in Whitefish, Montana in 2012.

2. New Hampshire

Per capita consumption: 42.2 gallons

Alcohol intake per capita (2012): 4.74 gallons (the highest)

Percent binge drinkers: 17.0% (22nd highest)

New Hampshire trailed only one other state in total per capita beer consumption in 2013, and it was the nation’s leading state for beer drinking as recently as 2011. Additionally, New Hampshire led the nation in per capita intake of alcohol in 2012, with residents drinking the equivalent of 4.7 gallons of pure alcohol that year on average, versus 2.5 gallons per legal adult nationwide. However, these figures may be somewhat distorted by sales to nonresidents by liquor stores located near state borders. Visitors often buy liquor and wine in the state because of the lack of tax at state-run liquor stores.


10 states where people drink the most beer

U.S. beer shipments, used to capture consumption levels, fell slightly from 28.3 gallons per drinking-age adult in 2012 to 27.6 gallons in 2013. Despite declining across the U.S., beer consumption remains quite high in some states. According to a recent study from Beer Marketer’s Insights, a brewing-industry trade publisher, residents in the state that drank the most beer consumed 43.6 gallons of beer per drinking-age adult in 2013. To identify the states drinking the most beer, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed 2013 per capita beer consumption in gallons among people 21 and over in each state, with data provided by Beer Marketer’s Insights. Hard cider was included for the first time this year. Total deaths, alcohol-related fatalities and estimated years of potential life lost are for the period 2006-10 and from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The percentages of adults reporting driving after excessive drinking, and drunken driving fatality statistics also came from the CDC and are for 2013.

From 24/7 Wall St., based on figures from Beer Marketer’s Insights, the following are the states where people drink the most beer.

11. Texas

Annual per capita consumption: 33.2 gallons
Change in alcohol consumption 2003-2013: -4.5% (5th largest decrease)
Percentage of binge drinkers: 16.7% (25th lowest)
Median household income: $51,704 (23rd highest)
Alcohol intake from beer declined 12.9% in Texas from 2003 through 2013, a larger drop than even the nationwide decline of 9.4%. Across all beverages, including wine beer and spirits, alcohol intake decline as well, by 4.5% — this was the fifth largest total decline. Still, the average Texas resident 21 years and over consumed 33.2 gallons of beer in 2013, tied for the 10th highest beer consumption nationwide. More people died by crashes involving drunken drivers in Texas between 2003 and 2012 than in any other state, at a total of 13,138. The rate of death due to drunken driving of 4.9 per 100,000 people was also among the higher rates nationwide. Above, Greg Duncan of Houston, Tex., sips on a beer before a Houston Texans football game in 2010.

10. Mississippi

Annual per capita consumption: 33.2 gallons
Change in alcohol consumption 2003-2013: -1.7% (11th largest decrease)
Percentage of binge drinkers: 12.4% (5th lowest)
Median household income: $37,963 (the lowest)
Drinking-age Mississippians consumed 33.2 gallons of beer each in 2013, tied for the 10th highest state per-capita consumption, and well above the typical level of 27.7 gallons nationwide. On average, each resident consumed 2.5 less gallons in 2013 than in 2009, roughly in line with the per capita beer consumption decline of 1.8 gallons across the country over that period. Nationwide, most drinkers preferred canned beer. Mississippians were no exception, with canned beer accounting for nearly 58% of consumption. However, Mississippians were far less likely to drink draft beer than Americans nationwide. Just 2.1% of drinking-age state residents drank draft beer versus 10% of Americans. Like several other states drinking the most beer per capita, the cost of living was relatively low. The cost of living in Mississippi, in fact, was the least expensive compared with other states, at nearly 14% lower than the national average.

9. Nebraska

Annual per capita consumption: 34.1 gallons
Change in alcohol consumption 2003-2013: 6.8% (13th largest increase)
Percentage of binge drinkers: 20.0% (7th highest)
Median household income: $51,440 (25th highest)
As in nearly all states drinking the most beer, Nebraskans were far more likely to binge drink than other Americans. One in five residents reported a binge drinking habit, the seventh highest proportion nationwide. While binge drinking includes beverages apart from beer, the state’s spirits consumption was also above average. The CDC has associated a range of negative health outcomes and economic costs to binge drinking, including premature death and higher medical bills. More than 19% of Nebraska residents rated their general health as excellent, however — one of the higher percentages. Still, they were also the most likely compared with people in other states to report driving after having too much to drink. While alcohol consumption from beer declined in the state, total alcohol consumption rose by just under 7%, with alcohol intake from spirits rising by more than 36% over the 10-year period.

8. Maine

Annual per capita consumption: 34.8 gallons
Change in alcohol consumption 2003-2013: 11.4% (4th largest increase)
Percentage of binge drinkers: 17.2% (18th highest)
Median household income: $46,974 (16th lowest)
Unlike all but six other states, beer consumption increased in Maine since 2009, with an average drinking-age resident consuming nearly three more gallons of beer in 2013 than they did in 2009. This was the largest increase nationwide, and it stood in contrast with the nationwide per capita decrease of 1.8 gallons. Between 2003 and 2013, alcohol consumption from beer in the state increased by 12.1%, the largest increase of any state over that time. As in other states, the higher per capita beer consumption in Maine may be partly due to low population density. There were just over 43 people per square mile in the state, less than half the national average density of 90.2 people per square mile.

7. Nevada

Annual per capita consumption: 34.9 gallons
Change in alcohol consumption 2003-2013: -10.1% (the largest decrease)
Percentage of binge drinkers: 15.2% (17th lowest)
Median household income: $51,230 (25th lowest)
Nevada per capita beer consumption in 2013 was nearly 35 gallons per person, well above the consumption level in the Mountain region, where the average annual consumption was nearly 31 gallons. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that Nevada residents are heavier beer drinkers, as tourists to the Las Vegas region are likely responsible for a large proportion of the state’s annual alcohol intake. Drinkers in the state preferred bottled beer more than their peers in other states, with bottled beer accounting for 42.6% of all beer consumption, the sixth highest percentage in the country. While people in the state drink more beer than the vast majority of Americans, per capita beer consumption in the state fell by 4.6 gallons from 2009, the largest drop of any state in the country. Above, a bartender pours beer at during the 30th annual Nightclub & Bar Convention and Trade Show on March 31, 2015 in Las Vegas.

6. Wisconsin

Annual per capita consumption: 35.8 gallons
Change in alcohol consumption 2003-2013: 3.9% (22nd largest increase)
Percentage of binge drinkers: 22.5% (2nd highest)
Median household income: $51,467 (24th highest)
In addition to drinking more beer than people in all but a handful of other states, 22.5% of Wisconsin adults reported binge drinking, the second highest percentage after only North Dakota. Drinking-age state residents were also among the nation’s most likely to be heavy drinkers — 7.8% reported drinking alcohol every day, the third highest percentage. In addition, more than 3% of adults said they had driven in the past 30 days after drinking too much, the fourth highest figure. Beer consumption fell in the nation by roughly 9.4% between 2003 and 2013. The trend in Wisconsin was no different, with alcohol consumption from beer falling by 7.5% over the same period. However, total alcohol consumption actually went up over that decade, with a 16.5% increase in alcohol use from spirits, and a 26.5% increase from wine.

5. Vermont

Annual per capita consumption: 35.9 gallons
Change in alcohol consumption 2003-2013: 16.4% (the largest increase)
Percentage of binge drinkers: 17.1% (21st highest)
Median household income: $52,578 (20th highest)
Vermonters 21 and over consumed 35.9 gallons of beer in 2013 on average, 1.2 gallons more than they did in 2009, the third largest increase — and Vermont was one of only six states where beer consumption did not decline over that period. Looking at a longer time span: from 2003 to 2013, only Vermont and one other state — Maine — saw an increase in alcohol consumption from beer. From all beverages, alcohol intake in Vermont increased the most over that period. Like most states drinking the most beer, Vermont is relatively rural — low population density has been associated with high propensities to drink more alcohol. Despite the high per capita beer consumption, nearly 22% of residents reported excellent health, the fourth highest such figure in the country.

4. South Dakota

Annual per capita consumption: 38.2 gallons
Change in alcohol consumption 2003-2013: 12.0% (3rd largest increase)
Percentage of binge drinkers: 19.2% (10th highest)
Median household income: $48,947 (22nd lowest)
Each South Dakotan consumed more than 38 gallons of beer on average in 2013, well above the national and regional per capita averages of 27.7 gallons and 33.5 gallons, respectively. As was the case nationwide, alcohol intake from beer declined in South Dakota, although by only 0.6%. With shares of total consumption from spirits and wine increasing 36.8% and 29.4% respectively — the seventh and fourth highest figures — overall consumption increased by 12% from 2003. This was the third largest overall increase. Living in sparsely populated areas seems to increase the likelihood of beer consumption, as most states drinking the most beer had below average population densities. There were just over 11 people per square mile in South Dakota, nearly the lowest population density nationwide.

3. Montana

Annual per capita consumption: 40.5 gallons
Change in alcohol consumption 2003-2013: 4.0% (21st largest increase)

Percentage of binge drinkers: 20.8% (6th highest)
Median household income: $46,972 (15th lowest)
Residents in the Mountain region of the U.S. drank an average of 30.6 gallons of beer per capita, higher than the national average of 27.7 gallons. Montana’s drinking-age residents drank even more, consuming an average of 40.5 gallons of beer per person annually. The high prevalence of beer consumption in Montana likely contributed to higher rates of drunken driving. While less than 2% of American adults said they had driven after drinking excessively in the past 30 days, 3.4% of Montana residents reported doing so, the highest percentage nationwide. Perhaps as a result, there were 9.4 deaths per 100,000 people from alcohol-related car crashes, second only to North Dakota.

2. New Hampshire

Annual per capita consumption: 42.2
Change in alcohol consumption 2003-2013: 7.3% (12th largest increase)
Percentage of binge drinkers: 16.8% (24th highest)
Median household income: $64,230 (7th highest)
New Hampshire’s beer consumption was the highest in the nation in 2009, 2010, and 2011. While consumption has fallen slightly from those years, residents drank an average of 42.2 gallons of beer in 2013, second only to North Dakota. In contrast, New England residents consumed an average of 31 gallons of beer that year. The state had the highest alcohol intake from wine, and by far the highest intake from spirits. This may not accurately reflect drinking habits among long-term residents, as New Hampshire’s low taxes and cheap alcohol attract many Americans from other states. Binge drinking was roughly in line with the national average, unlike most other states drinking the most beer. Binge drinking is strongly associated with negative health outcomes, and the low prevalence in New Hampshire compared with other states where people drink the most beer may partly explain the relatively good health among residents. Nearly 22% of residents reported excellent health, the fifth highest percentage nationwide. The state also had the lowest poverty rate in the country at 8.7%. Above, President Obama shares a beer with customers at a restaurant in Merrimack, N.H., in 2012.

1. North Dakota

Annual per capita consumption: 43.6 gallons
Change in alcohol consumption 2003-2013: 16.3% (2nd largest increase)
Percentage of binge drinkers: 23.8% (the highest)
Median household income: $55,759 (19th highest)
North Dakota led the nation for beer drinking, with each drinking-age resident consuming 43.6 gallons in 2013 on average, an increase of 1.6 gallons from 2009, the second largest such increase. The state’s beer consumption was the highest in the West North Central region of the country, which at 33.5 gallons was itself the highest average consumption level compared with the nine other regions reviewed. North Dakota also led the nation in binge drinking, with nearly 24% of adults reporting such excessive alcohol consumption. While the number of jobs in North Dakota dropped by 5,300 from April through May this year, economic factors can partly account for the state’s high beer consumption level. Not only was the cost of living nearly 10% lower than the national average, but also incomes in the state have risen dramatically in recent years as a result of the regional oil boom. In addition, the energy sector has attracted especially men, who are far more likely than women to binge drink. There were more than 11 persons per 100,000 people killed in an alcohol-related car crash, the highest rate in the country.


Which state consumes the most alcohol?

We break down alcohol consumption by state and reveal which state is drinking the most.

According to data from the Medibank Better Health Index, Victorians are consuming the least amount of alcohol, drinking 9.79 alcoholic drinks per week -- less than any other state.

At the other end of the scale, Queenslanders are the biggest drinkers, with our data showing that those in Sunshine State are drinking an average of 11.14 alcoholic drinks per week.

How do drinking trends differ state-to-state?

Tasmanians were found to favour wine -- both red and white -- more than any other state, while those in Western Australia consumed more glasses of champagne/sparkling wine on average each week than any other state. Queenslanders appear to be the nation’s biggest beer drinkers, with South Australians drinking the least.

How does our weekly consumption compare to the national guidelines?

According to the National guidelines, healthy men and women should drink no more than two standard drinks a day to reduce the lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury. And on a night out? The guidelines advise that we keep it to no more than four standard drinks on a single occasion of drinking.

So while it appears that most Australians may be sticking to these guidelines and drinking responsibly, we do know that many Aussies are drinking far too much. This puts us at increased risk of injury, accidents, violence and over 200 physical and mental illnesses.

With this in mind, it’s worth tracking how much you are actually drinking and getting familiar with what a standard drink is.

If Sunday morning is more or less synonymous with a “hangover” in your mind, a break from alcohol might be just what your body needs. Check out our 7 tips for tackling a break from alcohol here.

For more Medibank Better Health Index findings comparing the health of Australia’s states and territories, visit our State of the States collection.


States Drinking the Most Beer

Even though the pandemic and subsequent lockdowns seem to have made many people avid wine drinkers, according to data from Nielsen, beer is still the most preferred alcoholic beverage in the United States. A 2018 Gallup poll among American adults put the beverage at the very top, even as beer consumption has declined slightly over the last decade.

Beer consumption tends to vary considerably across the country. The only common characteristic among all 50 states is that fewer gallons of the beverage per capita were consumed in 2019 than in 2015.

24/7 Tempo reviewed annual beer consumption data per capita provided by Beer Marketer’s Insights, a brewing industry trade publisher, to determine the states where people drink the most and least amounts of beer.

Annual shipments of beer per capita range from almost 40 gallons in one state to less than 20 in another. Generally, residents of states in the Midwest tend to be the biggest beer drinkers, while residents of states in the Northeast consume the least beer with a few notable exceptions. Two New England states actually rank among the biggest beer drinkers in the country.

One reason why beer consumption appears to differ from state to state is a difference in purchasing laws and taxes. Nine of the 15 states with the lowest beer consumption per capita have some of the highest beer taxes in the country. States levy different levels of taxes on beer. They range from just .02 a gallon to almost $1.30 a gallon.

One of the most immediate risks associated with excessive drinking is fatal motor vehicle accidents. Nationwide, 28.0% of all driving deaths involve alcohol. The alcohol-related driving death rate is higher than the national rate in 31 states, and 12 of them are among the states where beer consumption is the highest. In Montana, the state with the highest beer consumption rate, 45.1% of driving deaths are alcohol related, the largest share of any state.

People may be drinking less beer overall, but sales of specialty brews are rising. The country’s 7,500-plus craft breweries shipped a total of 25.9 million barrels in 2018, up from 9.1 million a decade earlier — these are the most popular beer brands in America.


States That Drink the Most Beer

Despite declining across the United States overall, beer consumption remains quite high in some states. According to a recent study from Beer Marketer’s Insights, a brewing industry trade publisher, North Dakota residents consumed 43.3 gallons of beer per drinking-age adult in 2013, the most of any state. This was more than double the 19.6 gallons per legal age adult consumed in Utah, which drank the least beer. Based on figures from Beer Marketer’s Insights, these are the states that drink the most beer.

Between 2002 and 2012, the share of Americans’ total alcohol intake coming from beer has declined. The average drinking age adult drank the equivalent of 1.39 gallons of pure ethanol alcohol from beer in 2002, with a total intake of 2.39 gallons from all drinks consumed. In 2012, Americans pure alcohol intake was 2.46 gallons per person. Americans’ alcohol intake from wine and spirits rose by 15.2% and 20.9%, respectively, between 2002 and 2012. Meanwhile, intake from beer dropped by 8.6%.

While some of the states that drink the most beer generally followed this national trend, other states did not. Between 2002 and 2012, alcohol intake from beer consumption declined by 17.4% in Nevada, one of the top beer drinking states. In that time, alcohol intake from wine rose by more than 30%. On the other hand, alcohol intake from beer rose by more than 10% in both Vermont and Maine, also among the top beer drinking states.

Consuming excessive amounts of alcohol is associated with a range of health problems. One in 10 deaths among working age adults in the United States is due to excessive drinking, according to figures recently released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

According to the study, “Excessive alcohol use is responsible for 2.5 million years of potential life lost annually, or an average of about 30 years of potential life lost for each death.” Leading the nation in beer consumption, however, did not necessarily increase years lost per legal-age adult. Only three of the top beer drinking states exceeded the national average for years of potential life lost per 100,000 residents between 2006 and 2010.

According to Mandy Stahre, a co-author on the CDC’s study and an epidemiologist with the Washington State Department of Health, health outcomes such as alcohol attributable death rates are influenced by a number of factors, not only drinking patterns. “The number and the enforcement of alcohol control policies … sociodemographics, religious affiliation, race and ethnicity” all can play a role in determining the health consequences of drinking.

In an email to 24/7 Wall St., Eric Shepard, vice president and executive editor at Beer Marketer’s Insights, highlighted a study from the U.K.-based Institute of Economic Affairs, a free market think tank. The study explores the relationship between problematic drinking and consumption levels.

Policy makers often believe that high per capita consumption leads to excessive drinking, which includes heavy and binge drinking. However, the study’s authors contend that “per capita alcohol consumption largely depends on the amount of heavy drinking in the population, not vice versa.” Stahre added the she, too, was aware of studies that showed “a good proportion of the alcohol that was consumed was being consumed in a manner [associated with] binge drinking.”

The states with the highest beer consumption rates also had high rates of heavy drinking — defined as more than two drinks per day for men and more than one drink per day for women. In Montana and Wisconsin, 8.5% of adults were heavy drinkers as of 2012, tied for the most in the United States and well above the national rate of 6.1%. Additionally, seven of the states that drink the most beer had among the 10 highest rates of binge drinking — defined by the CDC for women as consuming four or more drinks, and five or more drinks in the case of men, during a single sitting.

Interestingly, while excessive alcohol use is hardly a healthy behavior, many of the states with the highest beer consumption rates were also likely to practice a range of healthy behaviors such as exercising regularly and eating well. People in Maine, New Hampshire, South Dakota and Vermont, for example, were all among the most likely Americans to eat healthy all day last year. Residents of Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota and Vermont were among the most likely to exercise regularly.

Stahre noted, however, that people are often better at keeping track of other behaviors than they are about drinking. “Because if you aren’t paying the bill or not paying attention to the number of drinks you have, you could really be underestimating what your consumption is.”


5. Ramos Gin Fizz

At first glance, this recipe may not seem that hard. Sure, it has more ingredients than usual, including cream and egg white. And the instructions are fairly basic: Dry shake. Add ice. Shake again. Strain.

What is lost in translation is how long and hard you do have to shake the Ramos Gin Fizz in order to achieve the right consistency. As any New Orleans bartender would know, it requires major elbow grease to churn these out, day after day. Let this be a lesson to home bartenders hoping to master this frothy concoction: Shake until you can shake no more.


Watch the video: Ο Μητσοτάκης πίνει Μπυρα στη ΔΕΘ